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hat does the Apostolic Christian Church believe? This church has never adhered to any creeds or confessions of faith, but instead the Bible as a whole. A common question in Apostolic Christian circles is "Is it Scriptural?" meaning, "Does it agree with the commandments and precepts of the Bible, especially the New Testament?" If it is, then it is something that Apostolic Christians will strive to abide by.

The Apostolic Christian Church comes from Anabaptist roots going back to the 1500's. The Anabaptist movement was seen as extremely radical when it began because its followers dared to dispense with all of the baggage from centuries of Roman Catholic theology and tradition and use only the Bible as their guide. The other reformers were quite comfortable letting many inherited beliefs and traditions from the Roman Catholic Church continue on in their new denominations (click on "History" above for an good overview of this).

Of course, today many churches claim to be "Bible-believing" churches, but is it possible that they have swept some parts of the Bible under the rug? We have shown our beliefs along side those of other common denominations in America just to make clear what the differences are and why. Our main beliefs are listed below briefly. Many have links to additional information and/or book recommendations for those looking for more detailed information on these beliefs.


Key To "More Information" References

anidia_pink.gif References that start with a red bullet are from this website or the Apostolic Christian Church and therefore reflect the views of the Apostolic Christian Church.

anidia_blue.gif References that start with a blue bullet are from third-party websites. These websites may contain views on other pages which the Apostolic Christian Church does not agree with.

 


The very first Christian churches were started by the disciples of Christ and those associated with them. They taught the first Christians what Christ had taught them. After a time, the church came under great persecution and most of the prominent leaders were executed. But all was not lost because their teachings were put into writing; these same documents can be found in the Bible that we have today. Not surprisingly, these Scriptures became the guide for the early church. Unfortunately, as the centuries passed, men in church leadership started relying more on their own ideas and opinions than the teachings of Jesus and His disciples. This trend led to the corruption of the Christian church.

In 1176, the reformer Peter Waldo, distressed with the corruption of the church, urged a return to the Bible.  He was the first reformer of note to promote this concept, which became known as "sola scriptura," that is, using only the scriptures (not church laws, theology, creeds, traditions or papal pronouncements from the past) as one's guide for Christians and the church.

Most conservative churches claim to abide by sola scriptura (thus we have included them in the "yes" column), but in practice, most conveniently ignore or rationalize away verses which they are not willing to abide by. Probably the worst hypocrites were the Lutherans who made this their motto during the Reformation; they insisted on upholding many Roman Catholic traditions which had no Scriptural support and actively persecuted those who dared to follow the Scriptures in their entirety.

Scriptural Basis: 1 Timothy 4:13, 2 Timothy 4:2

 

 

digital_next.gif    The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

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anidia_pink.gif  The History of the Apostolic Christian Church  A good overview of the history of the Christian church starting from the resurrection of Christ. The need for and beginnings of the sola scriptura movement are discussed.

anidia_pink.gif A Bible-Believing Church?  A brief discussion of how topical and liturgical sermons often lead to ignorance of the Scriptures and the need for a sola scriptura approach to preaching.

 

anidia_blue.gif What Did The Early Church Believe About The Authority Of Scripture (Sola Scriptura)? A historical review of sola scriptura in practice in the early church.

Inerrancy of Scripture has become the bulwark of those churches with fundamentalist beliefs (beliefs based on the "fundamentals" of the Bible). Inerrancy is the belief that the Bible as the inspired word of God and should be taken literally (not allegorically, as in the Roman Catholic Church, for example).

More liberal dominations have concluded that the Bible is unreliable, seriously flawed, or little more than another book of ancient literature or fairy tales and not to be taken literally. Most of these beliefs originated with liberal critical scholarship which started in the 1800's and infiltrated most mainline seminaries shortly after. It may surprise some to know that Roman Catholic scholars have been even more critical of the Bible than most liberal Protestant scholars; this is probably due to the fact that most of their doctrines are in direct conflict with the teachings of the Bible, along with their long history of giving greater authority to church traditions than the Bible.

Scriptural Basis: 2 Timothy 3:16

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

Unlike most mainline and liberal denominations which have placed more faith in scientific knowledge than the Bible, the Apostolic Christian Church believes in the virgin birth of Christ and the miracles that Christ performed, His divinity and His resurrection from the dead. Jesus said that if we do not believe He is the Son of God, we will die in our sins (John 8:24). Paul reiterated this in 1 Corinthians 15:12-21, where he said that if Christ was not raised from the dead, we are still dead in our sins and there can be no hope for our own resurrection and eternal life. And Christ made it clear that faith in Him had to include His divinity and His miracles (John 5:36, etc.).

Note: Because space is limited and as Christ's miracles are so numerous in the Bible, the Scriptural references below only show verses which stress the importance of believing in Christ's resurrection & miracles (not the miracles themselves) and the virgin birth. Needless to say, if one threw out every verse that referred to a supernatural occurrence in the Bible, there would not be much else left!

Scriptural Basis: Matthew 11:3-6, Mark 2:8-11, 16:20, Luke 1:26-35, 7:20-23, John 5:36, 7:31, 8:24, 8:58, 10:30-38, 14:8-11, 20:30-31, Acts 2:22, 1 Corinthians 15:12-21, Hebrews 2:3-4, etc.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

The Trinity is the unity of God, Christ and the Holy Spirit. While the word "Trinity" is never mentioned in the Bible, the relationship between God, Christ and the Holy Spirit are made clear, Christ is from and of God, the Holy Spirit is from God and therefore the three are One. The Three are mentioned together in Matthew (we are to baptize in the name of the Father, Son and the Holy Spirit), 2nd Corinthians and 1st Peter. Nearly all denominations claim to believe in the Trinity, with the exception of some Pentecostals.

Scriptural Basis: Isaiah 42:8 (prophecy of Messiah), Matthew 28:19, John 8:58 & 10:30-38 & 14:8-11 & 14:16-20 & 14:26, 2 Corinthians 13:14, 1 Peter 1:2, etc.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

 

If there is any one heresy that is worse than all others, it is probably the misguided belief that there are many ways to God. This is not the case. The Old Testament made it clear that the available "other ways" at that time did not lead to God, but to destruction. And in the New Testament, Christ said, "I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father, but through Me" (1 John 14:6) (NASB).  From another perspective, one would think it would only be a matter of common sense that Christ would not sacrifice Himself on the cruel cross if that were completely unnecessary for the remission of our sins and our eternal reward! With the sacrifice of His Son, God set up a new order, the book was closed on the Mosaic law and the temple sacrifices and the way of Jesus Christ, the long-awaited Messiah, had begun.

Most liberal Protestant denominations have welcomed the idea that there are many ways to heaven besides Christ. But considering their perspective, it would be quite natural for them to come to this conclusion because they have always valued and relied more on their personal opinions and the ideas of contemporary society than the unchangeable Word of God. The idea of strict adherence to the Bible is repugnant to them. And it may surprising for many to know that with Vatican II in the 1960's, the Roman Catholic Church has also given much credence to the idea that there are many ways to God, even through pagan and New Age beliefs.

Scriptural Basis: Luke 13:23-27, John 3:17-18, 6:44, 10:1-9, 14:6, Acts 4:12, etc.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

 

In Jesus's time, it was evident that some thought that they would be saved because of the ceremonies, rituals and religious works that they had performed. Many in our time believe the same thing, but the Bible makes it clear that such things can not save us. We can only be saved by a complete trust and faith in Jesus Christ. When we do that, we are made holy in the sight of God because of the grace of Jesus Christ.

Most denominations have accepted the doctrine of salvation by grace, with the exception of the Roman Catholic Church, some liberal Protestant denominations and a handful of conservative denominations. Recently the Roman Catholic Church has given much lip service to the idea of salvation by grace, but their longstanding church practices and theology (which have not changed) show that they have no intention of putting it into practice.

Scriptural Basis: Acts 15:11, Romans 3:24, Galatians 3:1-5, 3:24-26, Ephesians 2:5-8, 2 Timothy 1:9, Titus 3:7

 

 

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digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

Many denominations have added to the doctrine of salvation by grace by stating that once a person makes an initial commitment to Christ, he will be saved from his sins and guaranteed a heavenly reward, regardless of how he conducts his life after his initial commitment. It is an assumption that Jesus does not require discipleship from those that believe in Him; it is an assumption that true faith does not require any actions on the part of the believer. According to this doctrine, if it could be shown that Adolph Hitler had made a commitment to Christ as a young man, he would be saved. This doctrine was unknown in the Christian church until the time of Luther. It comes from a misunderstanding of Scripture and by using various verses out of context.

The Bible is filled with numerous passages which contradict this doctrine. Jesus and the Apostles made it clear that being a Christian was a lifetime commitment of faith, obedience and self-denial. Jesus stated on many occasions that He had high expectations of His followers and those that did not live up to them would be "burned in the fire"--a clear allusion to hell. Also, Christ reserved some of his harshest condemnations for hypocrites. Jesus said that only those who obeyed His commandments would be part of His kingdom and that we would have to sacrifice our own selfish desires to do it (Matthew 16:24, Mark 8:34, 10:21, Luke 6:46-49, Luke 9:23, John 10:27, 14:15, 15:10-14, etc.).

Paul began his epistle to the Romans with a condemnation of those that practiced various sins and noted that "those who commit such things are worthy of death" (Romans 1:32) and then went on to talk about the doctrine of grace. And he ended his epistle to the Galatians, which was almost entirely about the doctrine of grace, with a condemnation of various types of sinful activities and the warning that "those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God." (Galatians 5:21).

Conditional security is embraced by the Roman Catholic Church and some liberal Protestant denominations. However, the Lutherans and most of the Evangelical churches have fallen prey to the eternal security or once-saved, always-saved doctrine.

Scriptural Basis: Matthew 3:10, 5:22, 7:18-24, 13:37-43, 13:47-50, 16:14, 18:3-9, 25:14-41; Mark 8:34, 9:42-48, 10:21, 16:16, Luke 3:9, 6:46, 9:23, John 10:27, 14:15, 15:1-10, 15:14, Romans 1:32, Galatians 5:19-21, Ephesians 2:8-10, Hebrews 6:4, James 2:19-26, 2 Peter 2:1-22, 1 John 2:3-6, 2 John 1:6, etc.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_pink.gif The Possibility Of Falling From Grace   An article from the Silver Lining (an Apostolic Christian Church publication) regarding the doctrine of "eternal security."

 

anidia_blue.gif The Eternal Security Teaching   One of the better discussions of the once-saved, always-saved doctrine from an Anabaptist perspective. Also discusses grace, predestination, free will and assurance of salvation.

anidia_blue.gif Once Saved Always Saved: The Devil's Sin Gospel   A great starting point for articles disputing the fallacy of the "eternal security" doctrine.

The Apostolic Christian Church has always believed in the necessity of the born-again experience for salvation, it was the one thing that separated this denomination from other Anabaptists when it began. Jesus said that unless we are born again, we will not see the kingdom of God (John 3:3). The born-again experience is a spiritual rebirth that happens when one seriously commits his life to Jesus Christ. It is an emotional experience as one is transformed and renewed by the power of the Holy Spirit.

This doctrine sets this church apart from many others because we do not believe that we are saved from the consequences of sin and given a heavenly home because one was born into a Christian family, or had been baptized as an infant or had completed a catechism or confirmation process, or because one tried to do good deeds while living on this earth; nor do we believe that salvation is something that occurs gradually over one's lifetime. Because of the recent popularity of the concept of being born again, some liberal denominations and even the Roman Catholic Church on a few occasions have claimed to be a body of born-again believers, but an inspection of their doctrines reveal that they have no idea of what being born again means (for instance, many of them teach that one is saved when he is baptized as an infant, etc.).

Scriptural Basis: Matthew 18:3, John 3:3-8, Galatians 4:29, 1 Peter 1:23

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

The Apostolic Christian Church differs from nearly all other churches that uphold the born-again doctrine with its belief that repentance, confession of sins and making things right with those they have offended must precede the born-again experience and that the culmination of conversion is brought by the peace of the Holy Spirit, which is a spiritually transforming experience difficult to put into words. However, in the past, many other denominations believed and practiced these things. For example, scholars who looked at the great spiritual awakenings of the past have noted that these same things were preached and practiced before and during these spiritual revivals. This included early Methodist, Baptist, Congregational and Holiness denominations, to name a few, but the practice has since died out in nearly all of these denominations.

Not surprisingly, even those who were very religious before they converted to the Apostolic Christian faith have remarked that they did not have a born-again experience and feel the peace of the Holy Spirit until they were committed enough to fully repent of their sins, confess them and make things right with their fellow man.

Scriptural Basis: Matthew 3:6, 4:17, 5:23-24, 18:3-4, Mark 1:8, 2:17, 6:12, Luke 3:9, 3:16, 5:32, 13:31, 13:51, 24:47, John 1:33, 3:3-8, 14:15-17, Acts 1:5, 2:38, 8:17, 11:16, 1 Corinthians 6:19,  2 Corinthians 7:10, Galatians 4:29, Ephesians 4:30, 1 Peter 1:23, 2 Peter 3:9, etc.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_pink.gif  The History Of The Apostolic Christian Church  A good overview of the history of the Christian church starting from the resurrection of Christ. The conversion experience of Samuel Froehlich (founder of the Apostolic Christian Church) is discussed.

 

anidia_blue.gif Is Repentance For Today? Some claim that because of God's grace, repentance is unnecessary.  Is this true? 

anidia_blue.gif Repentance  The necessity of repentance for the believer.

Infant baptism is the practice of baptizing infants, usually with the belief that such an act saves the infant or fills them with the Holy Spirit, etc. The Apostolic Christian Church does not practice infant baptism because there is not a single instance of infant baptism in the Bible and because the Bible teaches that repentance and conversion must precede baptism. And obviously, one can not repent and commit his life to Christ until he has the ability to reason. The Apostolic Christian Church believes that one can not be converted until they reach the age of accountability, when they have the ability to reason and can be held fully accountable for their actions. This doctrine is sometimes called the "believer's baptism." It is also interesting to note that the early church banned the practice of infant baptism.

The Apostolic Christian Church practices baptism by immersion based on the New Testament model, as opposed to baptism by pouring or sprinkling. After baptism, the rite of the laying on of the hands is performed (Acts 8:17, 19:6, 1 Timothy 4:14).

Some Protestant denominations, notably most Baptist and many Pentecostal denominations, uphold the believer's baptism. Most of these also uphold baptism by immersion. Nearly all other Anabaptist denominations uphold believer's baptism, but many of them use pouring instead of immersion for baptism. Roman Catholics, Lutherans, and nearly all mainline and liberal Protestant denominations practice some form of infant baptism.

Scriptural Basis: Mark 1:5, Matthew 28:19, Acts 2:38-41, 8:12, 8:17, 8:36-38, 18:8, 19:6, Colossians 2:12, 1 Timothy 4:14, etc.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_blue.gif A Critical Evaluation of Paedobaptism   A detailed refutation of infant baptism.

anidia_blue.gif Believer's Baptism In The Bible  A look at the scriptures concerning baptism in the Bible.

anidia_blue.gif Did the Lord's Churches Baptize By Immersion Before the 17th Century?  A Baptist look at early evidence of baptism by immersion.

Closed communion is the restriction of holy communion to those baptized in the church. In denominations that practice closed communion, baptized believers are clearly defined (i.e., not easily confused) with casual visitors or those who have not made a public commitment to Christ and that denomination. Obviously, it is nearly impossible to practice any kind of church discipline if it is not clear who is a bona fide member of that church and who is not, so closed communion often goes hand-in-hand with church discipline (see below).

Many denominations have practiced closed communion in the past, but don't anymore. Some Lutherans, most Roman Catholic Churches, Eastern Orthodox and many conservative Protestant denominations still uphold the practice of closed communion.

Scriptural Basis: 1 Corinthians 11:24-29, 2 Corinthians 6:14-18, see also Scriptures supporting church discipline below as the doctrine is closely related.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_blue.gif Closed Communion   A Baptist view of why we should restrict access to Holy Communion

Church discipline is the New Testament practice of looking out for one another and confronting them, if you see that person falling into sinful practices. It also includes dealing with those teaching heresy. Most discipline consists of a warning to a church member in private; only as a last resort is the person is removed from fellowship with the church. Those removed from fellowship may be returned to fellowship if they repent of their sins. Church discipline was practiced in the early church and even in many Protestant denominations until recently. Church discipline is necessary to stop the teaching of heresy and to keep the church pure.

Only the most conservative Protestant denominations practice church discipline to any degree. Others give it lip service, but it is hardly ever used. In the past the Roman Catholic Church used it, but since Vatican II, it seems to have lost all will to make use of it (even though it is still officially part of church doctrine).

Scriptural Basis: Matthew 18:15-17, Romans 12:8, 1 Corinthians 5:1-6, 1 Corinthians 5:9-13, 2 Thessalonians 3:14-15, 1 Timothy 3:1-7, 5:17-20, 2 Timothy 4:2, Titus 1:5-10, 3:10-11, 2 John 10:11.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_blue.gif Church Discipline  A look at the Scriptures supporting it; why it is good for the church and how it is to be practiced.

anidia_blue.gif Church Discipline: Missing The Mark  The decline of the practice of church discipline in most denominations over the last century and why it should be reinstituted.

anidia_blue.gif Mennonites In Europe: Church Discipline  A historical look at the decline of church discipline in the Swiss Reformed Church under it's founder Zwingli, contrasted with church discipline among the Swiss Anabaptists.

The Gospels make it clear that a life following Christ is to be a life of obedience, self-denial and full devotion to Christ. Apostolic Christians strive to live a life free of immorality, pride, greed, bitterness, bondage to sin, etc. A life of full devotion includes daily prayers and Scripture reading. Ungodly influences, such as worldly entertainment are avoided so that one can remain "unspotted from the world" (James 1:27, Titus 2:12, etc.). Apostolic Christians strive to refrain from cursing, swearing or obscene or off-color conversation, drinking to excess, wild parties, gambling, sexual immorality and the like as such things are prohibited by the Scriptures.

Only the most conservative Protestant denominations exhort their members to strive toward holiness. Others may grudgingly give it lip service. In stark contrast, Roman Catholics have been notorious for their endorsement of drinking, smoking, gambling and even swearing--even amongst their clergy!

Scriptural Basis: Matthew 5:13, 5:27-37, 12:36, 15:18-20, 19:19, 23:12, Mark 9:41-20, 10:2-12, 10:43-48, Luke 14:10, 14:27-35, 16:13, 16:18, 18:10-17, John 13:14, Romans 1:18-32, 6:16, 12:3, 12:17, 1 Corinthians 5:1-2, 5:9-13, 6:9-11, 6:19, 10:12, 13:4, 2 Corinthians 5:17, Galatians 5:14-26, Ephesians 4:2, 5:1-21, Philippians 2:3-11, Colossians 3:5-17, 1 Thessalonians 5:22,Titus 2:12, James 1:27, 2:8-11, 4:6-7, 1 Peter 1:16, 1 Peter 2:11, 2 Peter 2:9-22, Revelation 3:19-21, etc.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_blue.gif Christian Cursing  How many times have you seen supposed "Christians" swearing or taking the Lord's name in vain? A look at what the Bible has to say about it.

It is probably unusual to have the type of sermons practiced listed among a denomination's fundamental beliefs, but Apostolic Christians take this very seriously. It is of the utmost importance that the Scriptures are considered and expounded upon in their entirety and without exception. Most churches purposely screen out Bible passages that are  "unsettling," "difficult" or  "not politically correct" when it comes to considering sermon material. However the Apostolic Christian Church takes special measures to make sure no verse of the Bible is neglected (see links below for more detail). For example, the ministers in this denomination do not prepare their sermons beforehand, but open the Bible at random, read that chapter and base their sermon on those verses, relying on the prompting of the Spirit. Also, to avoid undue influence from the listeners (who often vote with their feet and/or pocketbooks when convicting Scriptures are preached on), ministers support themselves with other jobs, they are not paid for their preaching.

We are not aware of any other denominations using this practice, other than some other Anabaptist denominations.

Scriptural Basis: Matthew 10:18-20, 1 Corinthians 9:18, 2 Thessalonians 3:8-10, 2 Timothy 4:2-4.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_pink.gif A Bible-Believing Church?   A brief discussion of how topical and liturgical sermons often lead to ignorance of the Scriptures and the need for a sola scriptura approach to preaching.

anidia_pink.gif Are Preachers Like Politicians?   A discussion of how the clergy's sermon may be affected by the money in the offering plate or his salary.

anidia_pink.gif The History Of Church Leadership   A look at the organizational structure set up for the clergy in the Bible and how that was exercised in the first Christian church.

The Apostolic Christian Church abides by the New Testament commands regarding the Christian's appearance. This includes avoiding excess outward adornment such as expensive clothes, jewelry and elaborate hair styles, as well as the use of artificial enhancements such as wigs, plastic surgery, cosmetics or the use of immodest clothing (1 Timothy 2:9-10 & 1 Peter 3:3-4). Apostolic Christians also follow the Biblical directives that instruct men to wear their hair short  and women to wear their's long (1 Corinthians 11:14-15).

A century ago, most conservative Protestant denominations followed the Bible's teachings on a Christian's appearance, but now only a handful do. Those that still do include a few conservative Protestant denominations and some Pentecostal denominations. All others have chosen to ignore or rationalize away the Scriptures concerning a Christian's appearance.

Scriptural Basis: 1 Corinthians 11:3-16, 1 Timothy 2:9-10, 1 Peter 3:3-4, etc.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_pink.gif Does Appearance Matter?  Does it matter how Christians dress? Absolutely, according to the Bible, there are specific instructions in the New Testament on how a Christian ought to dress. This article thoroughly discusses the Biblical directives on the Christian's appearance regarding such things as clothing, hairstyle, headcoverings, jewelry and cosmetics. This article also discusses how the first Christians applied these Biblical directives to their own lives.  

 

anidia_blue.gif Augustine On Appearance   Surprising evidence that even Roman Catholics were once against the use of lavish apparel and the use of jewelry and cosmetics.

anidia_blue.gif Excessive Adornment In Dress (1897)  Remarkable evidence that even Presbyterians were once concerned about modesty!

Female members of the Apostolic Christian Church wear headcoverings while in prayer. These are made of a lace netting material. This is in accordance with the directive in 1st Corinthians that requires this of women in the church. Older readers can probably recall that 40-50 years ago women traditionally wore a headcovering of some type (usually a hat) to church in Catholic, Anglican and in many Protestant denominations. Men however, left their hats on the hat rack once they got to church. This tradition can be traced all the way back to the first century church where it was first practiced. In the mid-20th century hats become unfashionable and most women stopped wearing a headcovering to church. Sadly, most were unaware that the tradition they so casually abandoned was based on an explicit command in Scripture.

Only a number of other Anabaptist denominations, a few Eastern Orthodox denominations (particularly those still in the "old country"), a very small number of Roman Catholic churches (the so-called "traditional" churches, mostly in Central & South America, many of which have held onto the Latin Mass and other pre-Vatican II practices) and a few small, very conservative Protestant denominations still uphold the practice of wearing a prayer veil.

Scriptural Basis: 1 Corinthians 11:3-16

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_pink.gif Does Appearance Matter?  This article thoroughly discusses the Biblical directives on the Christian's appearance regarding such things as clothing, hairstyle, headcoverings, jewelry and cosmetics. This article also discusses how the first Christians applied these Biblical directives to their own lives.  

 

anidia_blue.gif The Biblical Headcovering   A thorough look at the subject including its historical use in the church

anidia_blue.gif Calvin On Headcoverings, What one prominent Reformation leader taught on the subject

anidia_blue.gif The Christian Veiling   An analysis of scriptures regarding the veil.

anidia_blue.gif Headcoverings   An examination of evidence of the wearing of headcoverings starting at 100 A.D.

anidia_blue.gif Headcoverings & Modern Women   A concise discussion of the topic.

anidia_blue.gif Let Her Be Veiled   A collection of articles and testimonies regarding the use of headcoverings. 

anidia_blue.gif On The Veiling Of Women, John Chrysotom's (an early church father) on the subject

anidia_blue.gif Should Christian Women Wear A Headcovering In Church?  A review of scriptures dealing with headcoverings

anidia_blue.gif Woman's Head Covering And The Glory Of God   A thorough discussion of the issue.

anidia_blue.gif Women's Hats And Churches (1942)  The order that rescinded the Church of England's longstanding doctrine requiring headcoverings for women in church (note the lack of scriptural support for this change).

The New Testament of the Bible commands us to greet our fellow Christians with a "holy kiss." This was also practiced by the early Christian church. The Greek word behind "holy" in holy kiss is the same Greek word behind "holy" in "Holy Spirit," it is not something we can easily dismiss or take lightly if we are serious about our Christian walk. The Scriptures make it clear that this is not just an outdated custom that was practiced in New Testament times as some would like to suggest.

As far as it is known, the only others that greet one another with a holy kiss are other Anabaptist denominations. Some Eastern Orthodox churches have held on to a remnant of this practice, but it is only used for special church services, like Easter.

Scriptural Basis: Acts 20:37, Romans 16:16, 1 Corinthians 16:20, 2 Corinthians 13:12, 1 Thessalonians 5:26, 1 Peter 5:14.

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Roman Catholic Church

anidia_pink.gif The Holy Kiss   A discussion of how the holy kiss was practiced in the Christian church for centuries, its decline and why we should still use this Christian greeting in our churches.

In order to follow the commandment of Jesus to love our enemies and pray for those who persecute us, members of the Apostolic Christian Church will not allow themselves to be put a position where they must intentionally hurt or kill their enemies. In event of war where men and women are drafted into the military, Apostolic Christians act in the capacity of non-combatants, that is, as cooks, medics, etc. and will not carry a weapon. Not surprisingly, the early church viewed war the same way Apostolic Christians do; early records show that converts from the military were expected to leave their vocation and were promptly excommunicated if they took up the sword again.

This only changed only after the time of Constantine, the emperor who brought an end to the persecution of Christians. He claimed to be a Christian and even gave himself the title of "bishop" and injected himself into the church government of the day, but showed little evidence of a true conversion to Christ; for instance, he had two members of his own family killed and did not present himself for baptism until he was on his deathbed. Some Christian leaders of the day, in an effort to endear themselves to the Emperor, watered down the long-standing doctrine against war and violence so that the Emperor could be considered a Christian.

Only other Anabaptist denominations practice nonresistance (with the possible exception of some Quakers and a handful of other minor groups).

Scriptural Basis:  Matthew 5:21-26, 5:38-44, 7:12, Luke 6:27-28, Romans 12:14-21, 13:8-10, Hebrews 10:30

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_blue.gif The Christian And Nonresistance   A look at the Christian view of war, according to the Scriptures.

anidia_blue.gif Shall I Enter The Army?   Surprising support for the doctrine of nonresistance from Dwight L. Moody (Moody Bible Institute has since abandoned the doctrine of their founder).

Like most denominations, the Apostolic Christian Church believes that the endowment of the spiritual gifts of prophecy, healing and tongues ended with the age of the Apostles. The Apostle Paul said that these would cease and vanish (1 Corinthians 13:8). In addition, the kind of babbling that some current-day Pentecostals claim as speaking in tongues is contrary to the speaking in tongues found in the New Testament where believers spoke coherently in languages unknown to them (Acts 2:4-12). Also, the doctrine taught by most Pentecostal and Charismatic churches that one is not saved unless he speaks in tongues is plainly contrary to Scripture; it is clear that in New Testament times there was a diversity of gifts, not everyone was given the same spiritual gift (1 Corinthians 12).

However, this does not mean that the church does believes that it is impossible for God to heal someone of an illnesses, this can happen on rare occasions of the Lord's choosing. Also, the church has been known to practice the anointing of the elders in case of serious illnesses (Mark 6:13 & James 5:14). Also, the church believes that the Holy Spirit can prompt and lead believers as taught in the New Testament.

Generally, only Pentecostal/Charismatic denominations believe in the present-day existence of the gift of tongues, healing and prophecy. There are some small, scattered charismatic groups within some larger denominations however, (even in some Roman Catholic churches) where such practices are tolerated, but generally not encouraged.

Scriptural Basis:  Mark 6:13, Acts 2:4-12, 1 Corinthians 13:8, 14:5, 14:19-27, James 5:14

 

 

digital_next.gif   The Apostolic Christian Church

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Conservative Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif    Most Mainline & Liberal Protestant Denominations

 

 

digital_next.gif   Roman Catholic Church

anidia_blue.gif The Charismatic Movement: A Biblical Critique  A look at the fallacy of common Charismatic doctrines.

anidia_blue.gif Have You Received The Baptism With The Holy Ghost?  A look at the problems with the Pentecostal practice of tongues.

 


Notes On Doctrinal Comparison Charts

We understand that these broad categories are generalizations, for instance, not all Presbyterian churches would fit into the "mainline and liberal Protestant" category. However, the vast majority of Presbyterian churches do, so this denomination is placed into this category. Also, where there was a significant number of denominations in a single category both agreeing and disagreeing with a doctrinal statement, we checked both the "yes" and "no" boxes in order to note  the diversity of beliefs on that doctrinal point.


Click here to read the complete Statement Of Faith for the Apostolic Christian Church Of America